#2030WhatAreUDoing? SDG ambassador for the 2018 Lavazza Calendar

“These Goals seem very academic and complicated, so we tried to humanize the data and statistics so everyone could see themselves in the story. […] In my role as cultural provocateur, with this project I have tried to ignite a respectful debate about moral compass, and the importance of good leadership. Because here there’s no negativity, no blame is laid, there’s just energy and passion: and so it’s a positive revolution. These are 17 extraordinary stories, which could be a source of inspiration and become the force leading a community of responsible global citizens, driven by compassion and a deep respect for service.” – Platon

Buddy Icon 1Earlier this year, I had the privilege of being invited as one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals ambassadors to feature in the 2018 edition of the Lavazza Calendar, representing SDG8 on Decent Work and Economic Growth due to my role in the Solutions Initiatives team of SDSN Youth. The Calendar’s theme is “2030, What Are You Doing?“, and tries to convey the message that the success of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development ultimately rests on the skills and vision of real human beings, coming from all countries and sectors of society.

From the Lavazza family to the incredible Platon, all the way to ASviS and my fellow ambassadors, I would like to congratulate everyone who has been involved in the launch of this project. Communicating the vision of the SDGs through the faces of those who are contributing to their implementation is an extremely powerful idea, and can strengthen civil society engagement across the full spectrum of the challenges addressed by the 2030 Agenda.

PS: if you haven’t already, I urge you to check out (and consider supporting) The People’s Portfolio, Platon’s wonderful initiative to use visual language in support of dignity and human rights for all. 

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Jean Monnet Module proposal selected by the European Commission

Exciting news! The European Commission’s Education, Audiovisuals and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA) has selected a Jean Monnet Module proposal I wrote with Prof. Riccardo Pavoni (University of Siena) for co-funding under the Erasmus+ Programme (Call EAC/A03/2016).

Among the 833 proposals received by the EACEA for Jean Monnet teaching and research activities, 141 were selected for funding. The project activities will now be hosted by the Department of Law of the University of Siena and implemented over the course of three years.

EULawSD seeks to explore the ever-expanding corpus of European Union Law relating to sustainable development, with an emphasis on its interactions with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development adopted by the United Nations in September 2015. The module will consist of an annual 40-hour course primarily aimed at students of the Single Cycle Degree Programme in Law at the University of Siena, but also open to students from the Political Sciences, Humanities and Social Sciences departments. The course will be complemented, on an annual basis, by a keynote opening lecture, a final expert roundtable, a dedicated website, and a series of webinars.

I am honored to be a co-recipient of such a prestigious grant, among the hundreds of applications received by the EACEA, and I look forward to my involvement as manager of the module’s activities despite my distance from Siena.

The full list of selected proposals can be found here.

The Sustainable Development Goals and international law: legal challenges to the achievement of ‘environmental’ Goals in the 2030 Agenda

 

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Photo Credit: UN Photo/Cia Pak

On 25 September 2015, Heads of State and Government from the 193 Member States  of the United Nations gathered at the 70th Session of the UN General Assembly in New York to adopt the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a “comprehensive, far-reaching and people-centred set of universal and transformative Goals and targets” which will “stimulate action over the next fifteen years in areas of critical importance for humanity and the planet”.

In its essence, the outcome document of the UN Sustainable Development Summit (which contains the much-heralded Sustainable Development Goals) delineated a policy framework concerned with mobilizing efforts at the international, national and subnational level around a set of common priorities relating to sustainable development, and by doing so, it then sought to address challenges as diverse and ambitious as ending poverty and hunger, combating inequalities, building peaceful and inclusive societies, promoting human rights, and ensuring the protection of the planet and its natural resources.

From this perspective, the adoption of the SDGs represented an unprecedented effort not only to move away from a development agenda still heavily dominated by a narrow focus on the economic and social components (something which is evident in the design -and failures– of the Millennium Development Goals), but also to positively identify the reciprocal interactions between the various components of sustainable development that must be taken into account by States at the stage of implementation. This effort, in turn, will now require transformative changes in the way all sectors of society deal with the above-mentioned challenges: from the economy to life sciences to law, existing institutions and systems of rules will be called upon to remove the obstacles to sustainable development and actively promote the achievement of the 17 Goals and 169 targets.

As a legal scientist with strong interests in the field of the environment, I believe that legal regimes are particularly bound to interact with the 2030 Agenda, and that ensuring a mutually supportive relationship between them will be necessary if human development is to stay within the Earth’s planetary boundaries in the next fifteen years and beyond. While I will explore this topic more in depth in an upcoming journal article which I am currently writing with Professor Riccardo Pavoni of the University of Siena (Italy), here I want to highlight the important governance function that international environmental law can play in the implementation of the ‘environmental’ goals and targets contained in Resolution 70/1. In fact, on the one hand, as recently maintained by the UNEP, violations of international environmental law “have the potential to undermine sustainable development and the implementation of agreed environmental goals and objectives at all levels”. On the other, international environmental law constitutes the normative backbone of many (possibly all) of the SDGs, in the sense that institutional and legal developments in the field of the environment can either “foster” or “frustrate” such goals, and that the development of innovative legal approaches, coupled with increased stakeholder engagement, is necessary to accommodate environmental protection concerns in the operationalization of the 2030 Agenda.

Indeed, it seems prohibitive to outline all the potential challenges that international environmental law will have to address in order to enable a mutually supportive relationship with the post-2015 development framework. Moreover, it could be convincingly argued that the underlying problem in this respect will remain the lack of integration between international environmental law and different legal regimes, with a strong emphasis on areas such as trade and investment law and human rights. At the same time, it appears possible, when examining the content of the 2030 Agenda in the context of other recent developments both in the activities of the UNGA and generally in international environmental law, to pinpoint at least some of these recurring challenges. Pavoni and I hold nine of them to be particularly important. More specifically, four are concerned with substantive issues (broadly corresponding to SDGs 12-15) while the rest mainly relates to procedural elements, means of implementation, and shortcomings in the general architecture of international environmental law.

The four substantive challenges are: (i) swiftly implementing the Paris Agreement on climate change and ensuring that commitments contained in the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) of the Parties remain ambitious on a pathway to the decarbonization of the economy by 2050; (ii) developing a new regime for the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction under the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, as currently mandated by Resolution 69/292 of the General Assembly; (iii) strengthening integration within international environmental law by promoting the definition of linkage-based plans, policies and programmes, with a particular focus on the widespread adoption of an ecosystem-based approach to environmental protection, increased consideration of the underlying drivers of biodiversity loss and ecosystem destruction, and the role of environmental impact assessment (EIA) laws; and (iv) advancing a holistic approach to the management of chemicals and waste under existing international conventions and developing new multilateral agreements on the subject, where needed. Taken together, these challenges continue to highlight major gaps in international environmental law, and addressing them would also mean achieving concrete progress around at least five critical planetary boundaries, including climate change, biosphere integrity, land-system change, and introduction of chemicals, nanomaterials, and other novel substances.

The remaining topics emphasize the need to further advance key procedural norms and to strengthen the means of implementation in legal regimes in the field of the environment. Most of them reflect long-standing normative trends in the development of international environmental law, while others represent relatively new topics lying at the intersection of law and policy which must increasingly inform the development of multilateral environmental agreements and the evolution of already existing institutions and regimes. They are: (i) harnessing foreign direct investment, official development assistance, and domestic finance for environmental protection, including through further promotion of the role of market-based instruments such as payments-for-ecosystem-services schemes (PES), consistent with the vision outlined in the Addis Ababa Action Agenda; (ii) increasing capacity-building in, and technology transfer to developing countries in order to operationalize the global indicator framework and, more generally, foster conservation and sustainable use efforts (i.e. in terms of establishment, management and effective monitoring of protected areas); (iii) reinforcing science-policy interfaces and bolstering the role of intergovernmental platforms in building capacity for the effective use of science in law- and decision-making at all relevant levels (i.e. in terms of the assessment and accounting of the economic value of ecosystem services); (iv) enhancing public participation in decision-making and access to justice and information as an indispensable component in the implementation of the procedural and substantive environmental rights of individuals and communities, as most recently urged at Rio+20; and (v) advancing liability regimes at the domestic and international level (but also, more generally, non-compliance procedures), particularly by moving away from the traditional rules of State responsibility in favor of more stringent civil liability rules.

It should be noted that it was not by chance that I reserved these two essential aspects for last. On the one hand, despite the message contained in Principle 10 of the Rio Declaration, progress on the topics of public information and participation and access to justice remains uneven, held hostage by geographical differences in the way human rights are being re-considered, translated into law and interpreted from an environmental perspective. As a consequence, it will be important to ensure that ambitious regional achievements on this topic, such as the Aarhus and Espoo Conventions, which provide for key procedural rights in the field of the environment, inform significant developments in other parts of the world. On the other hand, more than 20 years after the proclamation of Rio Principle 13 on liability and compensation, the emergence of rules of strict State liability and civil liability regimes in domestic legislation and/or multilateral environmental agreements continues to be undermined by the conflicting perspectives of States on issues such as the very definition of environmental damage, the role of the State in redress, the burden of proof, the scope of compensation, the limits of liability, and so forth. That these problems were carefully ignored in the drafting of the SDGs (not to mention the specific provision excluding liability and compensation contained in paragraph 52 of the decision adopting the Paris Agreement) bears further testimony to the steep task placed upon international environmental law in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda.

[Use the following citation when quoting from the article: Riccardo Pavoni and Dario Piselli, ‘Sustainable Development Goals and International Environmental Law: Normative Value and Challenges for Implementation’ (2016) forthcoming]

Fighting fundamentalism is about development

Photo Credit: Ahmed Mousa/Reuters
Photo Credit: Ahmed Mousa/Reuters

I’m an atheist, and I believe that, when discounting the historical importance that religion has had in shaping the artistic, moral, and cultural identity of nations, the religious view of life is just harmful to mankind.

Yet we can not pretend that religion does not exist. Only 16% of the world population identifies itself as unaffiliated, there are 2.2 billion Christians and 1.6 billion Muslims on the planet whose creed will not go away, nor will fade, overnight (or in a century, for that matter).

This is why it is despicable, the result of grim political propaganda (both the one driven by ISIS’ delusional mission and that fueled by our own far-right extremists), to describe the current situation as a clash of religions, or even call for a war ON religion, particularly Islam. To put it simply, the inability of some to understand, let alone analyze, the complexity of terrorism mirrors the blindness of fundamentalists, and it provides an equally fertile ground for isolation and mutual hatred.

A problem exists, however. It is the thin line beyond which religious beliefs, rather than ways to achieve a spiritual experience of the divine, become keys to interpretation of injustices and abuses of power, and means through which a hope of revenge is presented as not just possible, but even desirable. No confession is immune from this poisonous narrative: just think of the enthusiasm that the election of Pope Francis has created in the Catholic world, at a time when politicians seem instead unable to offer meaningful answers to the economic and social challenges we are facing.

Religion as a method of interpretation of reality (or perhaps, we might say, the exploitation of religion for political purposes) gives the illusion that faith can deliver a solution to suffering and poverty, and from such illusion flows much evil. It is not surprising, in this sense, that the main target of Daesh propaganda is the ‘gray zone’, i.e. those citizens of Islamic religion who have a hard time integrating in Western countries and who are confronted with a dramatic choice when they are most vulnerable to economic crises, social exclusion, and the restrictions of individual freedoms that derive from events such as the ones which occurred in Paris: either you choose a future with no prospects in a society that discriminates you, or seek compensation through Allah.

In other words, it is due time for the international community to seriously address the root causes of terrorism, which are not squarely religious, and to do that in a multipolar geopolitical context as well as through a perspective that refutes both the rhetorics of feel-good nonviolence and the idiotic idea that an ‘Islamist invasion’ is taking place.

On the one hand, it is indisputable that we shall fight the extremist fringes of fundamentalism, which is first and foremost an enemy of all the Islamic world, where the majority of massacres and mass rapes has indeed occurred so far. On the other, it is urgent (and necessary) to simultaneously invest in a system of international relations that favors a less unequal economic development and fosters greater social inclusion, be it in Europe, in the Middle East, or wherever extreme poverty and political instability continue to expose millions to the religious insanity of terrorist groups like ISIS.

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Sono ateo. Credo che, al netto dell’importanza storica delle religioni (tutte le religioni) nel plasmare l’identità artistica, morale e culturale dei popoli, semplicemente la visione religiosa sia dannosa per l’essere umano.

E tuttavia non possiamo far finta che la religione non esista. Solo il 16% della popolazione mondiale non si identifica con una specifica confessione, ci sono sul nostro pianeta 2 miliardi e 200 milioni di cristiani e 1 miliardo e 600 milioni di musulmani e questo numero non scomparirà né si assottiglierà, in una notte come in un secolo.

Per questo sono impensabili, frutto di una orrenda propaganda politica (sia quella delirante dell’ISIS che quella macabra e ignobile degli estremismi di casa nostra), tanto le invocazioni ad una guerra tra religioni quanto quelle ad una guerra ALLA religione, in particolare modo quella islamica. Semplicemente, l’incapacità di capire e analizzare la complessità dei fenomeni, che quotidianamente osservo nell’opinione pubblica e qui su Facebook, è speculare alla cecità del fondamentalismo, un terreno egualmente fertile per l’isolamento e l’odio reciproco.

Un problema però esiste, ed è quella sottile linea oltre la quale il credo religioso, da esperienza individuale del divino, diviene interpretazione della realtà, chiave di lettura delle ingiustizie e dei soprusi, e mezzo di somministrazione di una speranza di rivalsa. Nessuna confessione, di nuovo, è immune da questo rischio, basti pensare all’entusiasmo che l’elezione di Papa Francesco ha creato nel mondo cattolico, in un momento in cui la politica non pare invece in grado di fornire risposte alle difficoltà economiche e sociali che ci troviamo a vivere.

La religione quale metodo di interpretazione della realtà (o forse, potremmo anche dire, lo sfruttamento della religione a fini politici), qui sta il seme dell’oscurantismo, illude che vi sia una soluzione dettata dalla fede alla sofferenza ed alla povertà. Non sorprende pertanto che l’oggetto principale della propaganda di Daesh sia proprio ‘la zona grigia’, ovvero quella popolazione di religione islamica che faticosamente cerca di integrarsi nei paesi occidentali e che, vulnerabile di fronte alla crisi economica, all’esclusione, ed alle restrizioni delle libertà individuali che derivano da eventi come quelli di Parigi, viene messa di fronte a una scelta: o un futuro senza prospettive in una società che la ghettizza, oppure un avvenire di riscossa tramite Allah.

In altre parole, la comunità mondiale dovrebbe finalmente -e seriamente- affrontare le radici profonde del terrorismo, che non sono tout court religiose, in un contesto geopolitico multipolare e in un’ottica che vada al di là tanto delle teorie dell’invasione islamista quanto del mantra irreale del ‘vogliamoci bene’.
Sacrosanto (come ha detto ieri Massimo D’Alema al Tg3) combattere la frangia estremista del fondamentalismo, che “è nemico anche e soprattutto del mondo islamico, dove infatti ci sono state le principali offensive, i massacri, gli stupri di massa.” Necessario, però, investire contemporaneamente in un sistema di relazioni internazionali che favorisca uno sviluppo economico meno diseguale ed una maggiore inclusione sociale, in Europa come in Medio Oriente e, per estensione, ovunque la povertà estrema e l’instabilità politica continuino a prestare il fianco alle sirene della follia religiosa.

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#KnowYourGoals – A Campaign for the SDGs

Twitter_headerLast July 28th, the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Youth Network announced ‪#‎KnowYourGoals‬ – a global campaign to bring awareness of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to communities all over the world!

In partnership with oikos and Project Everyone, #KnowYourGoals calls upon everyone – organisations and individuals – to host an event during the month of September.

The aim of these events will be to explore the SDGs and most importantly, WHY they are important. SDSN Youth will host the events on its website and provide you with all the resources you need to make your event a success!

Find out how you can participate by visiting http://www.sdsnyouth.org/knowyourgoals.

SDSN Youth at the SDSN Mediterranean Conference

A few hours removed from the wrap-up of the 2nd SDSN Mediterranean Conference, I want to take the opportunity to congratulate all current members of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Youth Network on doing a wonderful job.

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A few hours removed from the wrap-up of the 2nd SDSN Mediterranean Conference, I want to take the opportunity to congratulate all current members of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Youth Network on doing a wonderful job to prepare and cover our session on “The Role of Youth for Sustainable Development“, not just the keynote speakers (Dario Bettaccini, Fulya Kundaklar, Şila Temizel) but many others who could not be present and whom I’d like to thank heartily for working tirelessly on the launch of this initiative and allowing me to be part of such a wonderful team for the foreseeable future, including (but not limited to) Siamak S Loni, Tim Dobermann, Michelle Huang, Melissa Peppin, and Ian Lieblich.

I also look forward to engage with executives and leaders of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network, and in particular those who attended the Conference (Maria Cortés-Puch, Holger Kuhle and Achim Dobermann), so as to make sure that SDSN Youth and SDSN work in close cooperation to support the adoption of a bold post-2015 agenda in New York later this year.

Finally, I applaud the organizing team from the Università degli Studi di Siena, who backed the idea of a session on youth involvement in the transition from the Millennium Development Goals to the Sustainable Development Goals and accomplished the feat of managing a perfectly successful event here in Siena.

P.S.: As SDSN Mediterranean unveiled the outcome document of the Conference, the “Siena Declaration for Sustainable Mediterranean Agriculture and Food Systems”, I welcome the inclusion of many poignant references to the role of Universities and Youth for sustainable development, which -I hope- is also due to the glaring success of our session on the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Youth Network’s proposal:

“4. UNIVERSITIES can play a pivotal role in tackling MED Agri-Food challenges not only through research and promotion of solutions, but also through education. They should provide students with sustainable development knowledge and skills useful for promoting principles and tools of integrated sustainability, awareness on the meaning and role of SDGs and SD research and execution. These skills are relevant also in the labour market. This last aspect is of particular importance for the Mediterranean area and, above all, for Mediterranean Agri-Food businesses (especially the smallest ones), which often suffer from a serious lack in expertise and knowledge on sustainable development principles and practices.

5. STUDENTS should be at the core of future sustainable development initiatives. Students at any stage of their career should be made aware of the role of Sustainable Development principles and tools, including SDGs, to tackle Mediterranean environmental and societal challenges.

6. BUSINESS world should adopt a different approach to sustainability. Recent data and statistics highlighted once again the leading role of the Agri-Food sector in Mediterranean economies, as well as on youth employment. To deal with new needs and contribute to implement SDGs, however, businesses should take advantage of the opportunities given by research on sustainable agriculture and business models.”

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