Youth, the SDGs and the Food Sustainability Index

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On December 1, I was honored to be invited to take part in the 7th International Forum on Food and Nutrition, hosted by the Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition (BFCN) at Università Bocconi in Milan, Italy.

There, I had the opportunity to join Peter Bakker (CEO of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development), Hilal Elver (UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food) and Rosie Boycott (Chair of London Food Policy) in a panel discussion on the launch of the first-ever Food Sustainability Index (FSI), a joint publication by BCFN and The Economist Intelligence Unit which ranks countries according to the sustainability of their food systems across the pillars of food waste, sustainable agriculture and nutritional challenges. In line with the work that is being undertaken at the UN level on a robust indicator framework to monitor the implementation of the SDGs, the FSI represents a helpful, if perfectible, tool to assist and empower communities, including young people, to take action to transform their agricultural and food systems for sustainable development. You can read more about it here.

At the event, which among many others was co-organized by the the Sustainable Development Solutions Network, I also joined my colleagues and fellow SDSN Youth delegates Andrea Zucca (National Representative for Italy), Fabrizio Saladini (Regional Representative for the Mediterranean) and Michela Magni (Project Officer, Solutions Initiatives) to celebrate and connect with youth solutions presented at the annual BCFN YES!, a competition for young researchers in the food and agricultural sectors.

Throughout the world, young farmers, young entrepreneurs, young leaders in rural communities are taking the lead to achieve SDG2 and positively impact their countries and regions. It is crucial that we recognize them not only as a key demographic for policy-makers to target, but also as exceptional problem-solvers and active contributors to the implementation of the food and agriculture-related targets of the 2030 Agenda.

  • You can watch the panel discussion on the launch of the Food Sustainability Index here (the panel starts at 53:07).
  • You can also watch the highlights of the 2016 edition of the BCFN Young Earth Solutions competition here.

SDSN Youth at UNGA71

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As the Leadership Council Meeting of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network gets underway in New York City on the eve of the 71st Session of the United Nations General Assembly, I am particularly proud of the ever increasing role played by the  Sustainable Development Solutions Network – Youth (SDSN Youth) in mobilizing action from all stakeholders around the urgent need to invest in youth as a key demographics for the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals worldwide.

With a particular emphasis on my position with SDSN Youth, I am also enthusiastic about the work of my team (Dominique Maingot, Michela Magni, Kanika Joshi and Angga D. Martha + Michelle Huang) ahead of such a crucial week, which made it possible to:

  • organize one of the main sessions of this year’s International Conference on Sustainable Development (entitled “Supporting Youth Solutions for the SDGs”, and featuring the likes of Rebeca Grynspan, John Rutherford Seydel III, Morten Nielsen and Marieme Jamme as speakers);
  • allow a number of young entrepreneurs pitch in their ventures in front of a panel of United Nations Foundation experts during another session of the ICSD;
  • advance the agenda of the Youth Solutions Report among our partners and supporters; and
  • push decisively forward with our project aimed at building the capacity of youth organizations to contribute to the SDG indicator framework as part of our role in the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data (stay tuned for updates!).

In a little more than a year, SDSN Youth has become a key global actor for youth involvement in the 2030 Agenda, and I am confident that we will continue to go beyond advocacy to support effective problem-solving by young people around the SDGs while also harnessing their skills as a necessary step for the sustainable development of all countries and regions.

* Make sure you follow updates from our delegation in New York on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SDSNYouth.
* Remember to RSVP to our event on “Reimagining the World in 2030”, taking place at Columbia University on September 20: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/reimagining-the-world-in-2030-tickets-27453691731.

 

Youth Solutions Report: celebrating and showcasing youth-led Solutions for the SDGs

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When ‘Transforming our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development‘ was agreed at the 70th Session of the United Nations General Assembly in September 2015, there was widespread agreement on the fact that the international community’s progress towards a sustainable future should be a matter of utmost importance for all inhabitants of this planet, but particularly for younger generations. The Agenda emphasized the need to address some of the most daunting challenges affecting youth worldwide, including unemployment, access to education and health care, and general lack of opportunities for the full realization of young people’s rights and capabilities. Moreover, it identified children and young women and men as critical agents for change, and lauded their ‘infinite capacities for activism in the creation of a better world’.

Yet, when describing the situation facing young people, who currently comprise one fourth of the global population, one aspect is often overlooked: the incredible potential of mobilizing and supporting their active contribution, rather than just discussing about their needs and problems. Young people not only have a stake because they will be the ones implementing the Sustainable Development Goals and because their well-being will depend on achieving them, but also (and especially) because they are part of the most educated generation in the history of the world, and through their skills, creativity, and enthusiasm they are uniquely positioned to deliver transformative change across multiple sectors of society.

Ranging from entrepreneurship to charity initiatives, scientific research, educational projects and all sorts of innovative endeavours, young people are already playing a major role in pushing our countries towards sustainable development. In the words of the former President of the United Nations Economic and Social Council, Martin Sajdik,

“The energy that helped us take the Millennium Development Goals from New York into local communities in countries around the world was to a large extent driven by the passion of youth-led organizations and their members […], and young people, once again, can be called upon to transform the SDGs from words in a document into a real and tangible guide for the next fifteen years that will determine the future of people and the planet.”

This is why, now more than ever, the efforts of young people should be celebrated and showcased at all relevant levels. This is also why we believe it is crucial to bridge the gap that still exists between youth-led solutions and those stakeholders, including businesses, governments, and fellow citizens, who could further empower, support and invest in them, once they know more about the incredible impact that youth are having across their communities and regions.

Today, the Sustainable Development Solutions Network – Youth announces the future launch of the Youth Solutions Report, a new major initiative which aims to identify and celebrate youth organizations, youth-led projects and ground breaking ideas that are successfully working towards achieving the targets set in the 2030 Agenda. Covering an international spectrum, it will consolidate information on 50 Solutions run by youth organizations and individuals committed to implementing the SDGs and making them a reality.

By launching the Report, we aim to give further voice to young leaders and innovators, by allowing them to communicate their undertakings, forge new partnerships and ultimately be the driving force behind the 2030 Agenda. As such, I strongly encourage you to be part of this exciting initiative, by submitting your own Solution or partnering with us in the launch and dissemination of the Report. Let’s make sure that the untapped potential of youth is finally mobilized to meet the challenge of sustainable development.

Learn more at youthsolutions.report.

The SDGs can transform our universities, if we accept the challenge

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The following is the text of a speech I recently gave on the role of universities as leaders on the Sustainable Development Goals, when I was invited to the 2016 International Sustainable Campus Network Conference, themed “Leadership for a Sustainable Future” (Siena, Italy, 13-15 June). This post originally appeared on SDSNYouth.org.

Good morning to you all and thanks for having me. It is a pleasure for me to be able to follow in the footsteps of my fellow presenters to discuss a few key points for what I think should be the main focus of universities (and epistemic communities more generally) as they take on a leadership role for sustainable development and seek to transform themselves, aligning themselves with the historic shift which I am convinced is under way, even if not always so visible, across all spheres of our societies.

Some of the points that I will give resonate in particular with what SDSN Executive Director Guido Schmidt-Traub said yesterday. I will try to build on some of his arguments and please don’t get bored, this was inevitable since I am, as he mentioned, a Project Leader for SDSN Youth (which is the global youth chapter of SDSN) and I also worked with SDSN Mediterranean when I was here in Siena. Organizational culture, you might say.

Along with my work with SDSN Youth and SDSN, I am also an M.Sc. student at the London School of Economics, a future PhD candidate in international law, and I have been a young leader ever since I was here at the University of Siena, where I worked closely with the Rector and the university staff to bridge the gap between academia and youth and engage with the challenges of sustainable development at the local, national, and global scales. In this sense, my arguments will be a synthesis of the different perspectives and angles of observation deriving from the sum of such different experiences, focusing at the same time on the role of higher education for sustainable development, on the role of youth and young innovators, and of course on the substantive issues which comprise the subject of my academic career.

I want to start by pointing out that there are two important areas on which I think we should devote our attention. The first one is the role of epistemic communities, in terms of how they lead on sustainable development, through their research, their advocacy and policy standards, their delivery systems, their shared goals and metrics, their road-mapping and implementation strategies, their monitoring efforts, and so forth.

The main challenge here, which is what Guido also referenced yesterday, is that you need a paradigm shift in the way universities plan their activities. It is not enough to think in terms of the quality of research, of how well-equipped, and skilled, and visionary our researchers are. We must think in terms of what they are working for, whether the long-term goals that they are setting as the blueprint for all their research activities are (i) policy relevant, (ii) consistent with the transformative change which is urgently needed in our countries and at at the global level, and (iii) bold and self-reinforcing, in order to create positive feedbacks and innovation and not just incremental developments.

From this perspective, there are three key points which can be outlined. The first point is that you should have a goal, a clear goal which allows you to undertake the stocktaking and prioritization exercise that can help shift the behavior of complex societal systems, and the behavior and practices of universities as a primary step. Goal-based planning has many advantages. In the simplest terms, you need to have a guiding light, something which explains what vision of society and the future you are presenting, one around which all activities of a university need to rally around, promoting integrating thinking, facilitating the building of coalitions and partnerships, mobilizing stakeholders, fostering system innovation and above all providing a shared narrative and normative framework. This is crucial, and this is also why I feel so enthusiastic about the Sustainable Development Goals. The real strength of the SDGs is precisely that they build a shared vision and are finally freed from the silo mentality that shaped the Millennium Development Goals. Their holistic framework of economic, social and environmental targets has the potential to inspire coherent, result-driven action, and to advance that kind of technology-driven development we so desperately need.

A second point relates to what kind of activities universities should engage in. We are used to think that R&D and planning is the main step of the innovation process, and of development in general, where universities and research can play their traditional role. This is simply no longer possible. Universities must be key actors in implementation and monitoring processes, engaging with other stakeholders, and harnessing the power of data to support countries’ efforts towards sustainable development. We are witnessing a true data revolution, and the SDGs call upon that data revolution (through the 169 targets, the indicators developed by the Inter-Agency Expert Group on SDG Indicators, and the work of the High Level Group for Partnership, Coordination and Capacity-Building for Statistics for the 2030 Agenda) to be directed towards monitoring, impact measurement, and implementation processes which will allow communities at all relevant scales to progress towards sustainable development. If we don’t know what we are doing (and often this is the case, with non existent, non reliable, non disaggregated data), we simply don’t know what are the needs and strengths, and where we are failing.

Finally, we need to promote dynamic ecosystems of universities interacting with each other, the larger epistemic community, and national/local governments. These are essential for translating knowledge into action. Universities must reinforce their role in multi-stakeholder partnerships, national strategies and local pathways through higher degree of mobilization and organization, through filling gaps in policy dialogue, and through efficient delivery systems. In other words, we must start to think of universities which engage in problem solving, universities that act IN society and not just for society. Building critical masses through networks and partnerships, undertaking that kind of solution-driven exercise, that kind of backcasting, is fundamental in explaining to policymakers what to do, as they often don’t know (and I am thinking of the problem of climate denialism, for example, which in part has been driven by the confrontational approach taken by the different positions and the failure of scientists to engage more deeply with the wider public opinion).

The other big area I want to focus on is concerned with the need to involve young people, and students, a hell of a lot more in what universities are doing. I have heard yesterday that universities build future leaders, but let me be clear, I think this is totally wrong, because young people must be recognized as TODAY’s leaders. There are 1.8 billion people aged 15-24 in the world, 25 percent of the global population, and they are arguably part of the most educated generation that has ever existed! As young people, we now have unprecedented access to knowledge, which is also spreading out (albeit with great inequality and daunting challenges) to developing countries, and the bottom line is that while we usually hear a lot about youth needs, wants, problems, and while leaders usually call only upon youth “creativity” and “enthusiasm”, young people are also incredibly skilled, have capacity to adapt, and possess that kind of fluid intelligence which is crucial to solve today’s complex problems.

In other words, universities don’t merely have to equip students for the labor market or to be professionals when they graduate. They have to put them to work now, and they have to empower them to contribute from the outset, for two main reasons. On the one hand, because young people’s stake in sustainable development is not one materializing in the distant future, but rather one which is already visible today, in terms of massive unemployment, unhealthy and risk-prone neighborhoods, climate change impacts, and so forth. On the other, because young innovators around the world are already playing a major role for their communities, and the problem is simply that we don’t communicate and disseminate those efforts enough, that we don’t create an environment which is conducive for investors, supporters, and institutions to partner with young people to help them unleash their full potential. So there are three points here as well.

The first thing that universities have to do is curriculum change. We have heard about it yesterday, but we miss one point. Curriculum change is the most powerful means of promoting transformative change through youth leadership across all sectors of society, but we don’t need just more courses on sustainable development, we need to transform the wide gap that exists between some subjects and others, particularly with respect to the way economics and finance are still taught in many institutions. In addition, we have to put emphasis on linking interdisciplinary knowledge and professional practice, making a positive case for sustainable development to be seen as an opportunity to build skills, specialize, get into a challenge which is simultaneously a personal and a social one. We need students from all disciplines to engage with sustainable development, and from this perspective high-quality Massive Open Online Courses, like those created by SDSN.edu, are crucial, and could be adopted tomorrow if all universities wanted.

Secondly, we have to create inclusive internal decision-making processes which facilitate exchange of information and fruitful cooperation between students and institutions and which may fill gaps in university strategies. Moreover, institutions involved in local pathways for the implementation of the SDGs must streamline the skills and creativity of young people in those pathways. There is a movement around the world of young people, which we don’t see, especially in developing countries, and that movement is ready to contribute now. It is important to remember that these movements, think for example of divestment groups, become protest only if universities are not able to effectively engage with them.

Third, the positive impact of young innovators must be showcased, assisted and incentivized in both academic and extracurricular activities: innovation prizes, competitions, and assistance in securing financial and managerial capital should become the norm for universities training a new generation of sustainable development leaders. We have to adopt the same solutions-driven mentality we advocate for countries to put students to work in practical problem-solving, allowing their skills to be employed while already in university, when there is an environment which can help them. The risk here is they get out of education and they find themselves out of work, or not immediately supported, and thus their ideas can’t be put into practice. Universities are the ideal ecosystem to promote entrepreneurship, applied research, and other student ventures (including educational programs aimed at kids and children). I am thinking, for instance, of Solar for Life, a brilliant non-profit organization launched by students at the University of Toronto to deploy renewable energy to rural communities in developing countries, promote developmental research, and foster sustainable entrepreneurship, which SDSN Youth partners with. Without a meaningful backing from their university, it would have been a lot harder for our friends at Solar for Life to scale up their efforts and kick-start pilot projects, and I think this and similar stories shall serve both as an inspiration and an encouragement for our higher education system to start partnering more with its pupils.

To conclude, what I outlined is a big challenge, because it confronts some of the path dependencies that universities are locked-into, and calls for transformative, not incremental change. But it is also a great opportunity that we have to make universities relevant again in the public debate, and to let them step up to the challenge of influencing business and governments in the implementation of sustainable solutions and mobilizing the youth skills, energy and visions that exist within themselves. This is the greatest opportunity we have, I would argue, because by doing so we would also boost our chances to achieve the 2030 Agenda and secure a sustainable future for our generation and those to come. Thank you. 

Statement on COP21 participation

Conférence des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques - COP21 (Paris, Le Bourget)
Conférence des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques – COP21 (Paris, Le Bourget)

The Paris Agreement is a done deal. Despite its foreseeable shortcomings, it is a global climate agreement that will shape transformational pathways of change for our economies and societies in the next decades and beyond. Every young individual around the world should read this text, or learn more about it from the excellent reviews that are already available online (one of my favorites here).

Personally, I am glad and honored to have spoken in a few side events at COP21 this past week to highlight issue of biodiversity conservation within the new climate change regime and to promote the active involvement of youth in the implementation of the climate agenda. I was also extremely pleased to attend the Global Landscapes Forum on December 5-6, which highlighted the many linkages that exist between ecosystems and climate change and showed the importance of building broad coalitions of governments, business, and civil society to address the challenges that landscapes are facing everywhere on our planet.

As the Project Leader for Solutions Initiatives at the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network – Youth, I have come in contact with many young people from around the world whose brilliant and tireless work on climate change only awaits to be recognized and supported by institutions, experts, and investors at all relevant levels. In 2016, we will continue to streamline such work in every forum and to help them implement and scale their transformative ideas and solutions.

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#KnowYourGoals – A Campaign for the SDGs

Twitter_headerLast July 28th, the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Youth Network announced ‪#‎KnowYourGoals‬ – a global campaign to bring awareness of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to communities all over the world!

In partnership with oikos and Project Everyone, #KnowYourGoals calls upon everyone – organisations and individuals – to host an event during the month of September.

The aim of these events will be to explore the SDGs and most importantly, WHY they are important. SDSN Youth will host the events on its website and provide you with all the resources you need to make your event a success!

Find out how you can participate by visiting http://www.sdsnyouth.org/knowyourgoals.